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What was the cause and effect of the Industrial Revolution?

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❶Since the Industrial Revolution was so new at the end of the 18th century, there were initially no laws to regulate new industries. The Poor Law of created workhouses for the destitute.

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Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again. Its about long and short term effects of industrial revolutions.

Comments 0 Please log in to add your comment. You also get to play with your Nintendo and Wii, and get stupid answers on you computer. Long Term Effects In the short term it increased city populations, people's living standards, trade between nations, and worker exploitation. It also meant a great deal of smoke and pollution and kids working 12 hour shifts in sweaty old factories.

Short Term Affects A short term effect is a consequence which happens in a short amount of time. A long term effect is a consequence which happens after a long period of time. The Industrial Revolution began in England during the s and spread throughout the rest of Europe.

The Industrial Revolution was a time of new inventions, products, and methods of work. The results of the Industrial Revolution led to many short and long-term positive and negative effects.

However the short-term negative effects outweighed the long-term positive effects of the Industrial Revolution. More presentations by Harold East Crowded Islands: Creating downloadable prezi, be patient. Delete comment or cancel. Cancel Reply 0 characters used from the allowed. They are free to decide what jobs are best for them. If the government regulates factory owners, it will increase the cost of doing business for all these new growing industries and decrease economic growth and jobs.

The government should establish a commission to investigate working conditions in the new factories and mills. The government should also consider passing a law setting tenhours as the maximum number of hours that workers should be allowed to work each day. The government should also repeal the Combination Acts, which prevented workers from organizing in unions. As workers migrated from the country to the city, their lives and the lives of their families were utterly and permanently transformed.

For many skilled workers, the quality of life decreased a great deal in the first 60 years of the Industrial Revolution. Skilled weavers, for example, lived well in pre-industrial society as a kind of middle class.

They tended their own gardens, worked on textiles in their homes or small shops, and raised farm animals. They were their own bosses. Their little cottages seemed happy and contented. But, after the Industrial Revolution, the living conditions for skilled weavers significantly deteriorated.

They could no longer live at their own pace or supplement their income with gardening, spinning, or communal harvesting. For skilled workers, quality of life took a sharp downturn: In the first sixty years or so of the Industrial Revolution, working-class people had little time or opportunity for recreation. Workers spent all the light of day at work and came home with little energy, space, or light to play sports or games.

The new industrial pace and factory system were at odds with the old traditional festivals which dotted the village holiday calendar. Plus, local governments actively sought to ban traditional festivals in the cities. In the new working-class neighborhoods, people did not share the same traditional sense of a village community.

Owners fined workers who left their jobs to return to their villages for festivals because they interrupted the efficient flow of work at the factories Stearns After the s, however, recreation improved along with the rise of an emerging the middle class.

Music halls sprouted up in big cities. Sports such as rugby and cricket became popular. Football became a professional sport in By the end of the 19th century, cities had become the places with opportunities for sport and entertainment that they are today Hobsbawm, Industry and Empire During the first 60 years of the Industrial Revoltuion, living conditions were, by far, worst for the poorest of the poor.

The Poor Law of created workhouses for the destitute. Families, including husbands and wives, were separated upon entering the grounds. They were confined each day as inmates in a prison and worked every day. Yet, despite these very harsh conditions, workhouse inmates increased from 78, in to , in This increase can only be viewed as a sign of desperation amongst the poorest of the poor.

What role, if any, do you think the government should take to improve living conditions in the new industrial cities? Choose the answer that best represents your point of view:.

One of the defining and most lasting features of the Industrial Revolution was the rise of cities. As migrants moved from the countryside, small towns became large cities. By , for the first time in world history, more people in a country—Great Britain—lived in cities than in rural areas.

As other countries in Europe and North America industrialized, they too continued along this path of urbanization. By , a majority of Americans lived in cities. In England, this process of urbanization continued unabated throughout the 19th century. The city of London grew from a population of two million in to five million forty years later Hobsawm, Industry and Empire The small town of Manchester , England also grew rapidly and famously to become the quintessential industrial city.

Its cool climate was ideal for textile production. And it was located close to the Atlantic port of Liverpool and the coalfields of Lancashire. The first railroads in the world later connected the textile town to Liverpool. As a result, Manchester quickly became the textile capital of the world, drawing huge numbers of migrants to the city. In , the sleepy town had a population of 22, Many of the migrants were destitute farmers from Ireland who were being evicted from their land by their English landlords.

In Liverpool and Manchester roughly 25 to 33 percent of the workers were Irish. This process of urbanization stimulated the booming new industries by concentrating workers and factories together.

And the new industrial cities became, as we read earlier, sources of wealth for the nation. Despite the growth in wealth and industry urbanization also had some negative effects.

On the whole, working-class neighborhoods were bleak, crowded, dirty, and polluted. Alexis de Tocqueville, a French traveller and writer, visited Manchester in and commented on the environmental hazards. From this filthy sewer pure gold flows. Here humanity attains its most complete development and its most brutish, here civilization works its miracles and civilized man is turned almost into a savage.

Click on the links of these two primary source accounts of the urban pollution in Manchester and London. Watch this video from PBS Newshour about urbanization today in less developed countries. What role, if any, do you think the government should take to improve conditions in the new industrial cities?

In the first half of the 19th century, urban overcrowding, poor diets, poor sanitation, and essentially medieval medical remedies all contributed to very poor public health for the majority of English people. The densely packed and poorly constructed working-class neighborhoods contributed to the fast spread of disease.

Roads were muddy and lacked sidewalks. Houses were built touching each other, leaving no room for ventilation. Perhaps most importantly, homes lacked toilets and sewage systems, and as a result, drinking water sources, such as wells, were frequently contaminated with disease.

Cholera , tuberculosis , typhus , typhoid , and influenza ravaged through new industrial towns, especially in poor working-class neighborhoods.

In , 10, people died of cholera in three months in London alone "Public Health Timeline". Tuberculosis claimed 60, to 70, lives in each decade of the 19th century Robinson. People who received medical treatment in the first half of the 19th century likely worsened under the care of trained doctors and untrained quacks.

Doctors still used remedies popular during the Middle Ages, such as bloodletting and leeching. They concocted toxic potions of mercury, iron, or arsenic. They also encouraged heavy use of vomiting and laxatives, both of which severely dehydrated patients and could contribute to early death, especially among infants and children whose bodies would lose water dangerously fast Robinson.

Even though there were more doctors in the cities, life expectancy was much lower there than in the country. Poor nutrition, disease, lack of sanitation, and harmful medical care in these urban areas had a devastating effect on the average life expectancy of British people in the first half of the 19th century.

The Registrar General reported in that the average life expectancy in rural areas of England was 45 years of age but was only 37 in London and an alarming 26 in Liverpool Haley. What role, if any, do you think the government should take to improve public health in the new industrial cities?

Child labor was, unfortunately, integral to the first factories, mines, and mills in England. In textile mills, as new power looms and spinning mules took the place of skilled workers, factory owners used cheap, unskilled labor to decrease the cost of production. And, child labor was the cheapest labor of all. Some of these machines were so easy to operate that a small child could perform the simple, repetitive tasks. Some maintenance tasks, such as squeezing into tight spaces, could be performed more easily by children than adults.

And, children did not try to join workers unions or go on strike. The tedious and dangerous factory work had negative effects on the health of children. Many appeared to be no older than seven. In the s, the British Parliament began investigating the conditions in factories for children.

One Member of Parliament, Michael Sadler, started a committee, in , to send investigators out to factories to interview children and gather evidence about their working conditions. Sadler sought to pass a bill through Parliament to decrease child labor and regulate all factories to have a hour work day. The transcripts from these investigations survive today as some of the best primary source evidence of child labor. Read the following accounts. Watch these short documentary videos to learn about the millions of children working as laborers today in countries around the world.

What role, if any, do you think the government should take to regulate child labor? The government should not intervene in the free market to regulate child labor.

If parents do not want their children to work in factories, then they should not send them there. It is the responsibility of the parents to find a suitable living or working environment for their children. The government should establish a commission to investigate child labor in the new factories and mills. The government should also consider passing child labor laws that set a maximum number of hours that children should be allowed to work each day.

The government should also consider investing in a public school system to educate its citizens. The Industrial Revolution completely transformed the role of the family. In traditional, agricultural society, families worked together as a unit of production, tending to fields, knitting sweaters, or tending to the fire.

Women could parent and also play a role in producing food or goods needed for the household. Work and play time were flexible and interwoven. Industrialization changed all that.

The same specialization of labor that occurred in factories occurred in the lives of working-class families, and this broke up the family economy. Work and home life became sharply separated. Men earned money for their families. Women took care of the home and saw their economic role decline. While many factory workers were initially women, most of them were young women who would quit working when they married. In stark contrast to the various changing tasks that a farmer performed in pre-industrial society, factory workers typically completed repetitive and monotonous tasks for 10 to 14 hours each day.

Industrial working-class families, though not working together, did serve an economic purpose of raising money to support each other. As we have seen, children often worked to earn some income for the family. In difficult circumstances, mothers struggled to make ends meet and keep the family out of the poorhouses.

Jane Goode, a working-class mother, testified before the British Factory Commission in The history of her family shows the worries and stresses of a mother struggling to survive. Her life shows the unfortunately common death rate of infants. Jane Goode had twelve children, but five died before the age of two:. I have had five children that have all worked at the factory.

I have only one that works there now. She works in the card-room.


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The Industrial Revolution began in England during the 's and spread throughout the rest of Europe. The Industrial Revolution was a time of new inventions, products, and methods of work. The results of the Industrial Revolution led to many short-term and long-term positive and negative effects.

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Spurred industrial growth. Creation of a thousand new jobs. Boosted England as agricultural and fishing industries. Encouraged travel.

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The long term effects of the Industrial Revolution include things like change in ideas, new ideas on how women should be treated, more efficient ways to manufacture products and better plans for the future and ways that the world should run. DBQ- Positive and Negative Effects of Industrial Revolution The Industrial Revolution began in England in the late ’s. The Industrial Revolution was a time of new inventions, products, and methods of work. The results of the Industrial Revolution led to many short and long-term positive and negative effects.

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Long Term Effects A few long term effects of industrialization on the modern world were more jobs and people, a rise in productivity, urbanization, health problems, pollution, working conditions which ultimately led to reforms and political movements leading to the new modern world with jobs and work. Short Term Affects A short term effect is a consequence which happens in a short amount of time.A long term effect is a consequence which happens after a long period of time. The Industrial Revolution began in England during the s and spread throughout the rest of Europe.