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List of Maya Angelou works

Maya Angelou American Literature Analysis

❶Marguerite Johnson was born in St. Hagen, her contributions to civil rights as a fundraiser and SCLC organizer were successful and "eminently effective".

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Most lessons, however, need to be learned and relearned, and so Angelou faces that uphill battle when, at the age of eight, she is displaced again, this time to be returned to her mother in St. Whereas Stamps represents security and orderliness, St. Louis symbolizes its opposites. Confused and terrified by this act and the subsequent murder of Freeman—a murder that the child mistakenly thinks she has caused—Angelou becomes a voluntary mute and lives in a world of silence for nearly five years.

She is healed by Bertha Flowers, a woman in Stamps, to which Maya returns. Flowers extends friendship to the mute Maya, a friendship that beckons the young girl to leave her self-imposed silence and embrace a new world of words, poems, songs, and a journal that chronicles this new stage in her life.

Moving to Oakland and then San Francisco in , at the age of thirteen, Maya rejoins her mother and deals with dislocation and displacement still again. At this point in her life, however, she is maturing and learning that the role of victim, while still a role to which she is assigned, is also a role played by others—blacks and whites.

She learns that the human challenge is to deal with, protest against, and rise above the trap of being victimized and exploited. In the final scene of the novel, Angelou is not merely a young woman coming to this realization for herself; she is a young mother who has just borne a son and who is therefore struggling to see how she can be responsible not only for herself but also for another.

The book ends with this sense of mutual responsibility and mutual survival: Mother and child know why the caged bird sings, and they will sing their song together. In her fifth autobiography, Angelou relates her pilgrimage to Ghana, where she seeks to understand her African roots. The source of security, she comes to learn, is not in a place but within oneself. Angelou chooses to live in Ghana following the end of her marriage.

Angelou joins a group of black Americans who have come to Ghana to be part of the great experiment. Angelou hopes that she and her son will find a land freed of the racial bigotry she has faced wherever she has lived or traveled. Hopeful and idealistic, she sets herself up for disappointment and disillusion. During her three-year stay in Africa, she is not welcomed as she has expected to be; even more painful, she is frequently ignored by the very people with whom she thinks she shares roots, the Africans.

As she tries to understand this new kind of pain and homelessness, she also struggles with the sense of having two selves, an American self and an African self. A stunning example of this struggle occurs when the black American community in Ghana, together with some sympathetic Ghanaians, decides to support the August 27, , March on Washington—the march led by Martin Luther King, Jr.

The march does not have the impact its participants hope it will have because the demonstrators, including Angelou, are ambivalent about who they are, where they are, and where their quest for security is leading them. This ambivalence is dramatized when one of the marchers jeers a black soldier who is raising the American flag in front of the American embassy, prompting Angelou to reflect on the fact that the Stars and Stripes was the flag of the expatriates and, more important, their only flag.

The recognition of her divided self continues during the remainder of her stay in African, including during time spent with Malcolm X. The volatile activist has a profound impact upon Angelou, who had met him two years earlier but who sees him and hears his words from her current context of an orphan looking for a home and looking for reasons to stay in that home. As she observes the various personalities Malcolm X exhibits—from big-brother adviser to spokesperson against oppression and for revolutions—she reflects upon his commitment to changing the status quo in the United States.

Ultimately, Angelou is compelled to return to the United States. She leaves, having become aware that home is not a geographical location but a psychological state. She was one of the most honored writers of her generation, earning an extended list of honors and awards , as well as more than 30 honorary degrees.

Angelou's successful acting career included roles in numerous plays, films, and television programs, such as in the television mini-series Roots in Her screenplay Georgia, Georgia was the first original script by a black woman to be produced.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. All my work, my life, everything I do is about survival, not just bare, awful, plodding survival, but survival with grace and faith. While one may encounter many defeats, one must not be defeated. Order Out of Chaos: The Autobiographical Works of Maya Angelou. Maya Angelou takes another look at herself". The New York Times. The Phenomenal Woman Rises Again". As feminist scholar Maria Lauret has stated, Angelou has made a deliberate attempt in her books to challenge the common structure of the autobiography by critiquing, changing, and expanding the genre.

Scholar Mary Jane Lupton has insisted that all of Angelou's autobiographies conform to the genre's standard structure: Angelou has recognized that there are fictional aspects to her books; Lupton agreed, stating that Angelou has tended to "diverge from the conventional notion of autobiography as truth", which has paralleled the conventions of much of African-American autobiography written during the abolitionist period of U.

Hagen has placed Angelou in the long tradition of African-American autobiography, but insisted that Angelou has created a unique interpretation of the autobiographical form. The challenge for much of the history of African-American literature was that its authors have had to confirm its status as literature before they could accomplish their political goals, which was why Angelou's editor Robert Loomis was able to dare her into writing Caged Bird by challenging her to write an autobiography that could be considered "high art".

Angelou has acknowledged that she has followed the slave narrative tradition of "speaking in the first-person singular talking about the first-person plural, always saying I meaning 'we'". Scholar John McWhorter called Angelou's books "tracts" that defended African-American culture and fought against negative stereotypes.

According to McWhorter, Angelou structured her books, which to him seemed to be written more for children than for adults, to support her defense of Black culture. McWhorter saw Angelou as she depicted herself in her autobiographies "as a kind of stand-in figure for the Black American in Troubled Times".

Although McWhorter saw Angelou's works as dated, he recognized that "she has helped to pave the way for contemporary black writers who are able to enjoy the luxury of being merely individuals, no longer representatives of the race, only themselves. Bloom has compared Angelou's works to the writings of Frederick Douglass, stating that both fulfilled the same purpose: According to scholar Sondra O'Neale, whereas Angelou's poetry could be placed within the African-American oral tradition, her prose "follows classic technique in nonpoetic Western forms".

O'Neale stated that although Angelou avoided a "monolithic Black language", she accomplished, through direct dialogue, what O'Neale called a "more expected ghetto expressiveness". McWhorter, however, found both the language Angelou used in her autobiographies and the people she depicted unrealistic, resulting in a separation between her and her audience. As McWhorter stated, "I have never read autobiographical writing where I had such a hard time summoning a sense of how the subject talks, or a sense of who the subject really is".

McWhorter asserted, for example, that Angelou's depiction of key figures like herself, her son Guy, and mother Vivian did not speak as one would expect, and that their speech was "cleaned up". Guy, for example, represented the young Black male, while Vivian represented the idealized mother figure. The stiff language Angelou used, both in her text and in the language of her subjects, was intended to prove that Blacks were able to competently use standard English.

McWhorter recognized, however, that much of the reason for Angelou's style was the "apologetic" nature of her writing. When Angelou wrote Caged Bird at the end of the s, one of the necessary and accepted features of literature at the time was "organic unity", and one of her goals was to create a book that satisfied that criteria.

The events in her books were episodic and crafted like a series of short stories, but their arrangements did not follow a strict chronology. Instead, they were placed to emphasize the themes of her books, which include racism, identity, family, and travel.

English literature scholar Valerie Sayers has asserted that "Angelou's poetry and prose are similar". They both relied on her "direct voice", which alternated steady rhythms with syncopated patterns and used similes and metaphors e,g. According to Hagen, Angelou's works have been influenced by both conventional literary and the oral traditions of the African-American community. For example, she referenced over literary characters throughout her books and poetry.

In addition, she used the elements of blues music, including the act of testimony when speaking of one's life and struggles, ironic understatement, and the use of natural metaphors, rhythms, and intonations.

Angelou, instead of depending upon plot, used personal and historical events to shape her books. Although Angelou considered herself a playwright and poet when her editor Robert Loomis challenged her to write I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, she is best known for her autobiographies. According to Lupton, many of Angelou's readers identify her as a poet first and an autobiographer second. Washington has called her "the black woman's poet laureate", and has called Angelou's poetry the anthems of African Americans.

Angelou has experienced similar success as a poet as she did as an autobiographer. She began, early in her writing career, of alternating the publication of an autobiography and a volume of poetry. Angelou's most famous poem was "On the Pulse of Morning", which she recited at the inauguration of President Bill Clinton in Lupton has insisted that "Angelou's ultimate greatness will be attributed" to the poem, and that Angelou's "theatrical" performance of it, using skills she learned as an actor and speaker, marked a return to the African-American oral tradition of speakers such as Frederick Douglass, Martin Luther King, Jr.

Angelou delivered what Richard Long called her "second 'public' poem", entitled "A Brave and Startling Truth", which commemorated the 50th anniversary of the United Nations in Also in , she was chosen to recite one of her poems at the Million Man March. As Angelou's biographers have stated, Angelou had "fallen in love with poetry in Stamps, Arkansas".

After her rape at the age of eight, she memorized and studied great works of literature, including poetry, and according to Caged Bird, her friend Mrs. Flowers encouraged her to recite them, which helped bring her out of her muteness. Angelou's biographers have also stated that Angelou's poems "reflect the richness and subtlety of Black speech and sensibilities" and were meant to be read aloud.

Angelou has supported her biographers, telling an interviewer in that she wrote poetry so that it would be read aloud. Scholar Zofia Burr has connected Angelou's "failure to impress professional poetry critics" to both the public nature of many of her poems and to Angelou's popular success, and to critics' preferences for poetry as a written form rather than a verbal performed one.

Burr has countered Angelou's critics by condemning them for not taking into account Angelou's larger purposes in her writing: The sun has come. The mist has gone. We see in the distance I was always yours to have.

We wear the mask that grins and li It shades our cheeks and hides our This debt we pay to human guile With torn and bleeding hearts… We smile and mouth the myriad subt.

The highway is full of big cars going nowhere fast And folks is smoking anything that Some people wrap their lies around And you sit wondering. I note the obvious differences in the human family. Some of us are serious, some thrive on comedy. Some declare their lives are lived. When you come to me, unbidden, Beckoning me To long-ago rooms, Where memories lie.

Offering me, as to a child, an att. Beloveds, now we know that we know Without notice, our dear love can In the instant that Michael is go Though we are many, each of us is Only when we confess our confusion. Does my sassiness upset you? Your smile, delicate rumor of peace. Deafening revolutions nestle in th cleavage of your breasts. When love is a shimmering curtain Before a door of chance That leads to a world in question Wherein the macabrous dance Of bones that rattle in silence.

Your skin like dawn Mine like musk One paints the beginning of a certain end. The other, the end of a. Soft grey ghosts crawl up my sleev to peer into my eyes while I within deny their threats and answer them with lies.

You drink a bitter draught. I sip the tears your eyes fight to A cup of lees, of henbane steeped Your breast is hot, Your anger black and cold,. Your hands easy weight, teasing the bees hived in my hair, your smile at th slope of my cheek.

On the occasion, you press. A last love, proper in conclusion, should snip the wings forbidding further flight. Give me your hand Make room for me to lead and follow you beyond this rage of poetry. Her arms semaphore fat triangles, Pudgy hands bunched on layered hip Where bones idle under years of fa And lima beans. Her jowls shiver in accusation. One innocent spring your voice meant to me less than tires turning on a distant street. Your name, perhaps spoken,.

A free bird leaps on the back of the wind and floats downstream till the current ends and dips his wing. We die, Welcoming Bluebeards to our darke Stranglers to our outstretched nec Stranglers, who neither care nor care to know that. They went home and told their wive that never once in all their lives had they known a girl like me, But They said my house was licking cle.

She came home running back to the mothering blackness deep in the smothering blackness white tears icicle gold plains of She came home running. We, this people, on a small and lo Traveling through casual space Past aloof stars, across the way o To a destination where all signs t It is possible and imperative that.

I keep on dying again. Veins collapse, opening like the Small fists of sleeping Children. Memory of old tombs,. We, unaccustomed to courage exiles from delight live coiled in shells of lonelines until love leaves its high holy te and comes into our sight.

There are some nights when sleep plays coy, aloof and disdainful. And all the wiles that I employ to win. Funky blues Keen toed shoes High water pants Saddy night dance Red soda water. Early years Marguerite Johnson was born in St.


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Maya angelou essays Maya Angelou is one of the great figures in contemporary American literature. Her poetry helps spread the word of equality to African American women and to all those who are oppressed. It is for this reason, she has received so much critical acclaim. In order to fully understan.

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Poetry Analysis of Maya Angelou's Caged Bird - Poetry Analysis of Maya Angelou's Caged Bird ‘Caged Bird’ is a poem written by Maya Angelou which considers the conditions of .

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Maya Angelou Homework Help Questions. Give a critical analysis of the poem "Phenomenal Woman" by Maya Angelou. To critically examine Angelou's poem "Phenomenal Woman," let us first look at the. Maya Angelou's Still I Rise Essay - This seminar paper will look at a poem written by Maya Angelou, Still I rise, An analysis of this poem will be provided, exploring the meaning of the poem and the language used to present a certain image to the audience.

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Still around today, Maya Angelou is one of the most dominant voices and writers of our time. She was born Marguerite Johnson on April 4, , in St. Louis, Missouri. As a child, most of her time was spent with her brother, Bailey Johnson, and they were raised by their paternal grandmother, Momma, in Stamps, Arkansas. Maya Angelou (born Marguerite Ann Johnson; April 4, – May 28, ) was an American author and poet. She published seven autobiographies, three books of essays, and several books of poetry, and is credited with a list of plays, movies, and television shows spanning more than fifty years.