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The Homework Dilemma: How Much Should Parents Get Involved?

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❶The other group of students forms a circle inside the first circle; each student faces one of the students in the first group.

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Adjust your plan as you go, letting your child take as much ownership of the process as possible. In some homes, that means doing it right after school; for others, it can mean waiting until after dinner if your child is the type who needs to expend some energy before he dives back into the books. Dolin recommends giving all kids at least 30 minutes to have a snack and unwind, with one caveat: Giving kids a half-hour break between after-school activities and homework is a smart idea, too.

If your child goes to a babysitter or aftercare program, make a deal that while he's there he'll work on one assignment—something easy he can do even with distractions—every day before he gets home so he has less work later. The key is to be consistent about the routine. Take a few weeks before homework gets heavy to try different approaches and see what works best, then stick to it.

Everyone deserves a break on Fridays, of course. But pick a regular time during the weekend for homework. If your kid is truly stuck on a homework assignment, don't make the common mistake of trying to reteach the information. Your goal is not to become your child's study buddy. Plus, your approach might be too different from the teacher's.

You don't understand what your teacher is saying, and your parents teach you another method. Instead, send an e-mail or note to the teacher asking her to please explain the material to your child again. If your child is a fourth-grader or older, have him write the note or talk to the teacher. It's important that he learns how to speak up for himself.

The teacher will likely have office hours earmarked for those who need help. Also ask her about specific websites many school textbooks now have practice sites kids can use in conjunction with the material in the book or check out an online tutoring site like growingstars.

Some kids do best with a desk set up in their bedroom so they can work independently; others want to be smack in the middle of the kitchen while you cook dinner. Mayzler recommends letting kids choose their preferred study spot. Wherever your child does homework, keep it distraction-free—no TV, video games, or loud siblings playing nearby. Of course, it's okay—and actually necessary—to sit with 5-or 6-year-olds while they do homework.

However, your goal should be to help less over time and move physically farther from where your child works. Laura Laing and her partner, Gina Foringer, make a point of staying out of the room where their daughter, Zoe, 11, does homework.

That way, Zoe is encouraged to think through her work on her own before asking a parent for help. Even when Zoe asks a question, Laing often responds with more questions instead of answers. Zoe often works out her own solution by talking it through with her mom.

When it comes to proofing a homework assignment, less is definitely better. Check a few answers to ensure that your child understands what's she's doing, but don't go over the entire page. After all, your child's teacher needs an accurate measure of whether she really understands the work. But those extra minutes and hours logged at home can help your kid get a leg up in the classroom.

Here, the case for homework and how to help your kid succeed. When is it time to look for outside help? Watch out for these factors, which will determine whether your kid needs a tutor. If you don't know where to start finding a tutor for your child, these six steps will help you find one-on-one help.

With teachers handing out more assignments than ever, our kids are stressed, sleep deprived and, worst of all, becoming disillusioned with learning. But many frustrated parents are fighting back -- and winning. When your kid says she can't solve a math problem or spell a tricky word without your help, don't fall for it. We've got a lesson plan to make her DIH. Some kids find it difficult to stay on top of homework after a long school day. Here are 3 things parents can do to make the process less stressful.

Getting the job done is about to become a lot more fun and less like pulling teeth. The kids will love these new perfect-for-home school supplies so much that they'll jump to do those worksheets. After a full day at school, the last thing your child probably wants to do is writing or math.

Here's how to help him focus and finish. Is your kid struggling to put effort into school? Get advice on how to be his biggest cheerleader to inspire him to do well. Homework is an important element of your child's schooling. It reinforces school lessons and instills an early sense of responsibility in your child. Find out if your behavior is promoting good homework habits. Help your child tackle homework most effectively.

Here are some best practices to follow. These six tips will show how to get your kids on track with their schoolwork and lay the foundation for good study habits.


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Homework booklet for parents of elementary and junior high school students. Helps parents understand why homework is important and makes suggestions for .

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Nov 12,  · Help With Forming Good Study Habits. Erika A. Patall, University of Texas When kids feel like homework has value and doing it is their own choice, it will seem more interesting and lead to greater achievement. The Homework Parent Trap. Alfie Kohn, author I think “back off and let 'em fend for themselves” is poor advice.

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Should parents help with homework? The answer may not be so simple. Parental involvement in homework. Studies show that children who spend more time on homework get better grades (on average) than those who spend less time. Parents who play an active role in homework are putting their kids in the best position to succeed. What can teachers do to help parents help their children with homework? Just what kind of parental involvement -- and how much involvement -- truly helps children with their homework? The most useful stance parents can take, many experts agree, is to be somewhat but not overly involved in homework.

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3 Things Parents Can Do to Help Kids Manage Homework Some kids find it difficult to stay on top of homework after a long school day. Here are 3 things parents can do to make the process less. Should parents help with homework? And if so, how much? It’s one of the first questions we get from the parents we work with, so we put together a guide that you can use to find an answer that works for your family. Below is a breakdown of when it makes sense to lend a hand, and how to do it effectively.